Monday, January 13, 2014

My Simple Kebari


    This journey I have taken since my first cast with a tenkara rod has truly been liberating. When I first started fishing tenkara I was a convert from western fly fishing and thus still had the match the hatch mentality. I never put much stock in one fly to rule them all mentality of true tenkara. Surely fish in Japan must be much dumber then the trout at the rivers I fished. Over time I began to experiment with my versions of sakasa kebari, tying them in a variety of colors and sizes, but again my thought process was tying them to match a specific bug. Luckily I eventually began tying and fishing fewer and fewer sizes and colors of kebari until I ultimately committed to a one fly approach last January. I was amazed at how productive my kebari worked. This past year was a very productive year in my journey in tenkara. My kebari consisting of badger hackle, UV dubbing, copper wire, black thread on a size 12 hook, seemed to do the trick everywhere.
  It seemed all was right with my journey in tenkara but still I felt unfulfilled and began researching more and more about tenkara. I read every blog post and watched every video I could find. I tried to learn something from every post, video and article I could, even if it was what not to do or how not to think. Eventually I began seeing a pattern many of the people I held in high regard tied very simple kebari. I began thinking that perhaps I didn't need wire or dubbing. Could I just fish a kebari with just thread and hackle on a hook? I knew that my thread would be black and my hook size would be a #12 because most of the bugs in the waters I fished were generally that size and black was always a confidence color for me. So now I just needed to find a hackle I could have an equal amount of confidence. I though that the same badger hackle would be a great choice but began netting bugs in all the waters I fished. Most were black, dark green, or a dark grey. I realized I made the right choice with thread color but I needed something to make a good contrast but not overpower the black body. I decided to go with a natural grizzly hackle. I have had four successful trips since the first of the year and while I need more time on the water to know for sure, I believe I may have found a kebari that is quick to tie, takes very little material, while looking very buggy and catching fish. This may just be my confidence fly from here on out. Anyway if you would like to comment or ask any question please fill free. Also I posted a picture of my kebari after successfully fooling a spooky winter brown. Happy new year and mahalo for taking the time to stop by my blog.
                                                                       Brian C.

Black thread, grizzly hackle, tied on a size 12 hook, fooled this very spooky winter brown.

6 comments:

  1. I am pretty new to Tenkara. I got my rod for Christmas. I am experimenting with tying kebari as well in search of a simple one fly. Love your photos and your one fly approach.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What an awesome Christmas present! I have enjoyed the pictures of the kebari you tied. I would actually pick the one you have the most confidence in and tie up about nine or ten and leave all other flies at home. This is how I finally became a true one kebari tenkara fisher. Good luck can't wait to see your pictures.

      Delete
  2. Nice blog B.C. I've heard your name over my years fishing Tenkara just stumbled onto your blog and blip on Tenkara flies. That's one of the things I've always liked best about Tenkara is playing around with fly patterns. I've caught fish on just hackle and a hook and super flies that were all but impossible to tie but still my favorite is just some thread and hackle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice to meet you Jimbo, and I agree that the combinations of hackle, body material and different thread colors, truly make tying kebari wide open. When I first started fishing tenkara I tied kebari in so many colors that I truly never had a chance to fish them all. I wanted to simplify my tenkara, because this was why I began fishing this way in the first place. I decided that I would pick one kebari and just fish it. Over time I began to realize that even my one kebari could be simplified and thus I am down to thread, hackle and a hook, with the same great fishing results. So I guess it's true the fly does not matter. Mahalo for taking the time to read and comment my post.

      Delete
  3. Brian love your blog. Would appreciate your comments on fishing community ponds lakes etc. What type of line-fly-techniques-etc. Very interested after your brief blog on this topic awhile ago. Thankyou for whatever advice you can give, riffle. By the way I live in SLC area also.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Mahalo for taking the time to comment on my post. It's nice to see a fellow tenkara angler in the SLC area, as there are some great tenkara waters in Utah. I will write another post to address your questions. I have already begun as I write this comment so it should be up within the next few days. Which waters to you typically fish in the Salt Lake area? Anyway again I appreciate you taking the time to read my blog.

    ReplyDelete